Saturday, June 27, 2009

VOCABULARY FOR JUNE 27, 2009

Today's Word "excoriate"
excoriate \ek-SKOR-ee-ayt\ (transitive verb) - 1 : To express strong disapproval of; to denounce. 2 : To tear or wear off the skin of. "Besides which there stirred not the least breath of wind, and flies and gadflies did swarm in prodigious quantity, which, settling upon her excoriate flesh, stung her so shrewdly that 'twas as if she received so many stabs with a javelin, and she was ever restlessly feeling her sores with her hands, and cursing herself, her life, her lover, and the scholar." -- Giovanni Boccaccio, 'The Decameron' Excoriate comes from Late Latin excoriatus, past participle of excoriare, "to take the skin or hide off, to flay (literally or figuratively)," from Latin ex-, "off" + corium, "skin, hide."

Monday, June 15, 2009

CONGRATULATIONS.. but did you remember...?

Once again it was graduation time and once again proud parents and friends flocked the location to witness the graduation ceremonies. All was as always... well not really but we won´t go there, not now.

I wish to congratulate all the graduates of CCC ACE and CJC ACE. You did not surprise me in the least. You did exactly what I expected of you. Nothing more, nothing less.

Have a great life. Have a great time changing your lives. Go forth and be ambitious. Just don´t forget RESPECT, HONOUR, DIGNITY, LOVE, HOPE, JOY, KINDNESS AND GRATITUDE. Many Belizeans today seem to have forgotten what all these words are about. Try hard to not be a statistic. Be different. Make changes in your country and your lives. Never look back if it is not for something worth while or someone, for that matter. Many of you forgot something every important on graduation day and on the days leading to graduation. It made me sad but I guess we can only teach you so much and learning everything is not in your hearts YET. Hopefully one day you will remember and correct that which you let go off so quickly. And if you never do, well then one less thing will have been achieved on that great day, your graduation and what it stood for. If you read this you may not even realize what I am talking about. I will leave it up to you to seek out and find that which is lost.

Good luck,
Ms B

Thursday, June 11, 2009

WHAT ARE THE TRUE MEANING OF SOME WORDS? PART III

LOVE AND MUSIC: THEY GO TOGETHER AND MY ONE TRUE LOVE AND I. DOES IT FEEL THE SAME WAY TO YOU?

RESPECT: ALL THOSE WHO DO RIGHT OR HELP THOSE IN NEED SHOULD RECIEVE YOUR RESPECT. NOTE, TODAY IT IA HARD TO FIND RESPECT IN OUR YOUNG PEOPLE. PLEASE LISTEN TO ME AND LEARN TO BE RESPECTFUL. IT WILL OPEN MANY DOORS FOR YOU!!

COMPASSION: SOMEWHERE, SOMEHOW THERE IS SOMEONE WAITING FOR US TO BE COMPASSIONATE. IT IS HOW LIFE IS.



Tuesday, June 9, 2009

WHAT ARE THE TRUE MEANING OF SOME WORDS?

DEPARTURE - A LOST HEART, A LOST FATHER, A LOST NEVER TO BE RETURNED
SORROW: A FEELING OF LOST WHEN SOMEONE LEAVES YOU BEHIND TO FACE A NEW CHALLENGE YOU KNOW THEY WOULD LOVE TO SHARE

LOVE: NO MATTER THE OBSTACLE OR THE DIFFERENCE, THE HEART KNOWS WHAT IT FEELS AND HOW IT FEELS AND THAT HAPPINESS IS CALLED LOVE
KEEP ON READING THIS BLOG AS THERE ARE MORE IMPORTANT WORDS TO COME IN THE FOLLOWING DAYS


Monday, June 8, 2009

GRAMMAR can be fun too!!!!

Use 'Fewer' Where It Counts
Q. More and more I hear the improper use of the word "less." I was taught that "fewer" is the word to use when referring to things that can be counted, however I rarely hear it anymore. Has this word fallen out of vogue and been replaced with "less" as a one-word-fits-all situation? -- Beulah Dillon, Black River, N.Y. A. I hereby nominate you for membership in SpuDBuFL -- the Society for the Preservation of the Distinction Between Fewer and Less. SPuDBuFL was founded by my seventh-grade English teacher, Emily Morris, who now lives in Saginaw, Mich., and reads this column regularly. (Hi, Mrs. Morris! I'm almost done with that extra-credit book report I promised you back in 1961.) The rule for "fewer" and "less" remains firm: "Fewer" should be used with countable items, e.g. "fewer people," "fewer ideas," "10 items or fewer." "Less" should be used with nouns that typically refer to a mass instead of an individual item, e.g. "less luggage," "less honesty," "less money." As with most rules, there are exceptions. "Less than," not "fewer than," is used before a plural noun denoting a measure of time, amount or distance ("less than five minutes," "less than $800," "less than 20 miles"). And "less" can be used with count nouns in the expressions "no less than, "or less" and "one less" ("no less than 100 people," "25 words or less," "one less problem to worry about"). The most common mistake is using "fewer" for "less" ("less people," "less ideas," "10 items or less"). When tempted to do this, pull the SpuDBuFL membership card from your wallet, and read the slogan Mrs. Morris taught me: "Use 'fewer' where it counts." Q. My daughter received this question from her teacher: "How does reading an eyewitness account of an historical event enrich your understanding?" Should it be "a historical event"? -- Jan, Windsor, Conn. A. Traditionally, grammarians have decreed that "a" should be used before words starting with "h" if the "h" is pronounced. So it would be "a house" and "a historical event," but "an hour" and "an honor." But when the accent falls on the second syllable, the "h" is barely pronounced. So reputable authorities -- even the redoubtable Mrs. Morris -- now accept the use of "an" before such words, as in "an historical event" "an habitual offender," "an homogenized mixture." It simply sounds more natural. ======== Rob Kyff, a teacher and writer in West Hartford, Conn., invites your language sightings. Send your reports of misuse and abuse, as well as examples of good writing, via e-mail to Wordguy@aol.com or by regular mail to Rob Kyff, Creators Syndicate, 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045. To find out more about Rob Kyff and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.
Copyright 2009 Creators Syndicate Inc.

Sunday, June 7, 2009

VOCABULARY FOR JUNE 7, 2009

Today's Word "concupiscence"
concupiscence \kon-KYOO-puh-suhn(t)s; kuhn-\ (noun) - Strong desire, especially sexual desire; lust. "Now, to speak of the first desire, that is, concupiscence, accordint to the law for our sexual parts, which were lawfully made and by rightful word of God; I say, for as much as man is not obedient to God, Who is his Lord, therefore is the flesh disobedient to Him, through concupiscence, wich is also called the nourishing of and the reason for sin." -- Geoffrey Chaucer, 'The Canterbury Tales' Concupiscence is from Late Latin concupiscentia, from the present participle of Latin concupiscere, "to desire eagerly," from com-, intensive prefix + cupere, "to desire." The adjective form is concupiscent. The name of the ancient Roman god of love, Cupid, comes from the same root.

Saturday, June 6, 2009

VOCABULARY FOR JUNE 6, 2009

Today's Word "concupiscence"
concupiscence \kon-KYOO-puh-suhn(t)s; kuhn-\ (noun) - Strong desire, especially sexual desire; lust. "Now, to speak of the first desire, that is, concupiscence, accordint to the law for our sexual parts, which were lawfully made and by rightful word of God; I say, for as much as man is not obedient to God, Who is his Lord, therefore is the flesh disobedient to Him, through concupiscence, wich is also called the nourishing of and the reason for sin." -- Geoffrey Chaucer, 'The Canterbury Tales' Concupiscence is from Late Latin concupiscentia, from the present participle of Latin concupiscere, "to desire eagerly," from com-, intensive prefix + cupere, "to desire." The adjective form is concupiscent. The name of the ancient Roman god of love, Cupid, comes from the same root.

Friday, June 5, 2009

AS I GO INTO THE TWILIGHT



(This Poem is dedicated to all the students of CCC ACE and CJC ACE)


As I enter into the twilight,

In a zone that is unknown,

My thoughts are of all the people I leave behind,

Of all the friends with whom I have grown.


I have shed many tears over the days,

And twisted and turned in my sleep,

For you all were everything in many ways,

And now the hurt is really deep.


But life is but a day to day reality,

And dreams are born and some do die,

So while we sometimes hide from sincerity,

The love I have for all of you, I cannot lie.


So I enter into the twilight,

Into the zone of no return,

Knowing that even when you´re out of sight,

From me you still have a lot to learn.


So will you come with me?

As I move away from where I use to be,

Will you remember all I said and did,

Or will you close the door and cover it like a jar with a lid?


For I´m going into the twilight,

Where only a few dare to go,

And when morning comes after the night,

I will be there no more.


Farewell, my children, my life,

You must go on without me,

For I´ve gone into the twilight,

Into that place which sets me free.


Brenda Aurora Ysaguirre

Copyright 2009 Brenda Ysaguirre

Thursday, June 4, 2009

VOCABULARY FOR JUNE 4, 2009

Today's Word "precocious"
precocious \pri-KOH-shus\ (adjective) - 1 : Characterized by or characteristic of exceptionally early development or maturity (especially in mental aptitude); as, "a precocious child"; "a precocious achievement." 2 : (Botany) Flowering or fruiting early. "Henry was precocious. His parents had great hopes for their offspring, and Henry, because he was so bright, seemed set apart for great things." -- Mary V. Dearborn, 'The Happiest Man Alive' Precocious is from Latin praecox, praecocis, ripe before the time, premature, cooked beforehand, from praecoquo, praecoquere, to cook in advance, from prae-, before + coquo, coquere, to cook, to ripen.